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Jin Shin Jyutsu & Energy

Posted by on Apr 16, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

Jin Shin Jyutsu & Energy

Jin Shin Jyutsu Practitioner, Lisa Thiel, answers the two most popular questions regarding Jin Shin Jyutsu: What is Jin Shin Jyutsu? Jin Shin Jyutsu is a very relaxing and restoring type of bodywork. It is less a technique and more a dynamic art form. All of us have energy pathways that, when flowing smoothly, allow for optimal health. Blockages result in discomfort, pain, and disease. JSJ is aimed at restoring one’s natural birthright of harmony and balance by keeping these pathways flowing throughout. There are 52 points in the body (26 on each side that mirror each other). These points, or “safety energy locks,” provide access to communicate with these energy pathways. The receiver is fully clothed while the practitioner uses a “flow,” or a sequence of holding these points with a light touch in a process referred to as “jumper cabling.” The practitioner begins a session by reading the recipient’s energetic pulses to determine where the greatest need is. Typically, 2-4 flows are used to help bring about the recipients’ own harmonious state. People who have received JSJ treatments report a profoundly relaxed state immediately following a treatment. The treatments are aimed at accessing our deeply held attitudes that get stored in our bodies and express themselves as dis-ease in the physical system. What is energy? Science states that energy is real yet not visible to the eye; we can only know it by its effects. Science also states that energy never goes away; it only transforms. As a battery powers our car and electricity enables our appliances to work, an organism’s energy system is the vital life force that powers our bodies and enables our organs and all physical systems to function. It is the subtle vibration that is necessary for breath and can be felt in terms of stamina. Try it out… $50 for a 50-minute session, or try a combined Jin Shin + Thai Reflexology session $60 for 60...

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Aerial Yoga is for Everyone

Posted by on Apr 4, 2016 in Blog, Featured | 0 comments

Aerial Yoga is for Everyone

In this lovely video segment, Beckie shows up how aerial yoga can assist new and experienced yogis alike in exploring and supporting their yoga practice.

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A Mantra for All Seasons

Posted by on Jan 13, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

A Mantra for All Seasons

Utilizing mantra in my practice has helped me to hone in on the root ideas I wish to use in guiding my awareness, thoughts, and actions in the coming seasons. It took me some time to distill, but in the end two words have presented themselves as my mantras for the time being…

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What is the link between sinusitis, depression, and sciatica?

Posted by on Oct 14, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

What is the link between sinusitis, depression, and sciatica?

What is the link between sinusitis, depression, and sciatica? By: Lauren Berendt, L.Ac. Acupuncture of course!   Acupuncture is one of many modalities that are under the umbrella term Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).  TCM is over 2,500 years old and originated from China. Within the realm of TCM is Qi Gong, Chinese Herbal Medicine, Nutrition and TuiNa (Chinese Medical Massage), Moxibustion, Cupping and Guasha. TCM is a complete medical system that understands that we are a microcosm of nature.  The TCM practitioner takes to mind how the human body interacts with the environment, including the weather, diet, emotions and the time of day.  TCM is used to diagnose and treat a wide range of disease, as well to prevent illness.  It does so by adjusting the body’s energy back into harmony. What to expect when you come in for an acupuncture treatment: It is best to wear loose fitting clothing, and be sure to eat something before your treatment. The TCM practitioner will review your health history, including your diet, emotions, sleep patterns and energy level.  Then the practitioner will ask you to lay on a massage table so she can feel your pulse and look at your tongue.  She does this as a diagnostic tool which helps her understand where the imbalance of energy resides, and therefore which acupuncture points to use in order to balance the body. You will either lay on your back, your belly, or a chair depending on your particular ability and your reason for treatment. She will use an alcohol swab to swab your skin where she will be placing acupuncture needles.  She uses thin, sterile, single use filiform (not hollow) needles inserted into acupuncture points on the body.  The needles typically stay in for 15-40 minutes.  You can move a little to scratch or adjust your body if need be as long as it isn’t painful to do so.  The needles are not inserted deeply and you should never feel a sharp or stabbing sensation.  Feeling nothing, dull, achy or heavy is common and is normal.  She will make sure you’re comfortable and may step out of the room to write up your chart while you listen to relaxing music.  She’ll check in with you in about 10 minutes and may proceed with moxibustion, Tuina, CranioSacral, cupping, guasha, Tuina, and/or reiki as needed for your particular treatment.  Once it’s time to take out the needles, they’re comfortably removed and disposed of in a red sharps box.  There are virtually no negative side effects to acupuncture, except an occasional bruise.  She’ll go over any recommendations and that’s it, you’re all set to enjoy the rest of your day! The conditions that acupuncture can treat is tremendously long.  Several common examples are: Sinusitis Earache Dizziness High Blood Pressure Irritable Bowel Syndrome Gastrointestinal Disorders Multiple Sclerosis Chronic Fatigue Infertility Morning Sickness Menopause Anxiety Depression Sciatica Migraine and Headaches Asthma Cold/Flu Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Addiction Chemo/Radiation Side Effects To learn more or book an appoint Click...

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Swiss Army Knife of Yoga Poses?

Posted by on Sep 26, 2015 in Blog, Uncategorized | 0 comments

By Lisa Thiel, E-RYT500 Only got 5 minutes and need a little yoga (or a lot)?  Try this Swiss Army knife of poses for an efficient practice… Prasarita Padottanasana (standing wide leg forward fold).     Why do it? Stretches the hamstrings, calves, adductors, and glutes Strengthens the front thighs and builds support for the knees Tractions the spine (in both the back and neck) Helps soften and release tension around the jaw Like most inversions, aids circulation of blood and lymph, invigorates, and helps us shift our perspective and prepare for new possibilities Helps us begin sensing mula bandha and uddiyana bandha How to do it:        Step or jump out into a wide stance, heels slightly wider than toes, hands on hips Feel all 4 corners of your feet connecting with the earth, maintain that by contracting front thighs Gently engage the low belly & lift the pelvic floor Keep lengthening through the spine as you hinge forward at the hips Rest the hands on the floor beneath shoulders (or modify using blocks or chair) If hands reach floor, slide them back to between the feet, shoulder distance apart with palms down and fingers pointing away; press into the floor and away from you to lengthen spine Try coming back up with just as much attention, support, and spinal lengthening Optional variations: Try turning it into a twist and shoulder opener by placing left hand on floor in the center of your gaze and rotate from the belly and extending right arm up.  Or hold on to outside of right leg with left hand to deepen the twist.  Repeat other side. Cautions: hypertension, glaucoma, risk of retinal detachment, stroke, heart disease, or GERD/acid reflux Meet Lisa Thiel during her weekly classes or upcoming workshop, Relieving Stress with Yoga, on October 24th!  ...

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How Often Do I need to get a Reiki Treatment?

Posted by on Sep 5, 2015 in Blog | 1 comment

How Often Do I need to get a Reiki Treatment?

Reiki is a simple, natural and safe method of spiritual healing and self-improvement that everyone can use. It has been effective in helping virtually every known illness and malady and always creates a beneficial effect. It also works in conjunction with all other medical or therapeutic techniques to relieve side effects and promote recovery. How often should I use this practice?

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